Tag Archives: Victoria and Abdul

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Costume Design

The simple fact that Phantom Thread is about fashion and the lead character is a dress designer whose work is shown off in the film positioned it as the frontrunner before any awards were handed out.

And we’re still sticking with it. It won the BAFTA award for Best Costume Design and, well, it’s about fashion — not to mention, Bridges has won this award recently, for The Artist.

But this race became a bit tricky when Phantom Thread lost the Costume Designers Guild award to The Shape of Water, which was a bit surprising, especially because The Shape of Water doesn’t necessarily stand out as a “costume” kind of movie, at least enough to win. It could, though, steal the award.

I’m going to stick with Phantom Thread though. The Shape of Water feels like a guild-specific win, whereas Phantom Thread feels like a film that the Academy would award.

The Nominees
Mark Bridges — Phantom Thread
Jacqueline Durran — Beauty and the Beast
Consolata Boyle — Victoria and Abdul
Luis Sequeira — The Shape of Water
Jacqueline Durran — Darkest Hour

Will win: Mark Bridges — Phantom Thread
Could win: Luis Sequeira — The Shape of Water
Should win: Mark Bridges — Phantom Thread
Should’ve been nominated: Jennifer Johnson — I, Tonya

 

Featured image via Focus Features.

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Makeup & Hairstyling

There’s not much to say here. Darkest Hour was the frontrunner before it came out. Darkest Hour was the frontrunner when it came out. Darkest Hour has been the frontrunner throughout the awards season, throughout the precursors. Darkest Hour will win.

If anything were to possibly spoil it, it would be Wonder. But with the talk around this specific aspect of the film, guild and BAFTA wins and the connecting power of Gary Oldman in the Best Lead Actor category, this is the closest thing to a lock.

And while it wouldn’t have competed, a nomination for Logan was certainly in order, and could’ve made this category a bit more interesting.

The Nominees
David Malinkowski, Lucy Sibbick, Kazuhiro Tsuji — Darkest Hour
Arjen Tuiten — Wonder
Daniel Phillips, Lou Sheppard — Victoria and Abdul

Will win: Darkest Hour
Could win: Wonder
Should win: Darkest Hour
Should’ve been nominated: Logan

 

Featured image via Focus Features.

First look at Saoirse Ronan in ‘Mary, Queen of Scots,’ scripted by ‘House of Cards’ creator

The first look of Saoirse Ronan, two-time Oscar nominee for her performances in Atonement and Brooklyn, in her new film Mary, Queen of Scots has dropped. The historical drama began filming on August 14 and comes from independent studios Focus Features and Working Title, who have worked together in the past on notable films such as The Theory of EverythingThe World’s End and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and will release Victoria and Abdul and The Darkest Hour later this year.

Beau Willimon, writer of The Ides of March and creator/showrunner of House of Cards until his exit after season 4, wrote the script for the film. British theatre director and artistic director of the Donmar Warehouse Josie Rourke will make her feature debut. Ronan will be joined by Jack Lowden, who appeared this summer in Dunkirk, as well as Joe Alwyn, David Tennant, Guy Pearce and Margot Robbie as Queen Elizabeth I.

Ronan will appear later this year in On Chesil Beach, a film from fellow English theatre director Dominic Cooke, when it premieres at Toronto International Film Festival in September. She’ll also star in Greta Gerwig’s directorial feature Lady Bird, from A24, which releases on November 10.

Look below for the first image of Ronan and the official synopsis of Mary, Queen of Scots:

Saoirse Ronan Mary Queen of Scots

John Mathieson/Focus Features/Working Title/Courtesy

Mary, Queen of Scots explores the turbulent life of the charismatic Mary Stuart. Queen of France at 16 and widowed at 18, Mary defies pressure to remarry. Instead, she returns to her native Scotland to reclaim her rightful throne. But Scotland and England fall under the rule of the compelling Elizabeth 1.  Each young Queen beholds her “sister” in fear and fascination. Rivals in power and in love, and female regents in a masculine world, the two must decide how to play the game of marriage versus independence. Determined to rule as much more than a figurehead, Mary asserts her claim to the English throne, threatening Elizabeth’s sovereignty. Betrayal, rebellion, and conspiracies within each court imperil both thrones – and change the course of history.”