Tag Archives: The Greatest Showman

Box Office Report: ‘Maze Runner’ races to the top as ‘Hostiles’ expands

Maze Runner: The Death Cure, the final installment in the series, opened to an estimated $23.5 million this past weekend to top the box office. The Dylan O’Brien led young adult action franchise has seen great financial success due in large part to the films’ ability to make a dent on a comparably low budget — the first being made for $34 million, the second for $61 million and this one for $62 million. Add in The Death Cure‘s international haul of $82 million, bringing the worldwide total to $105.5 million, and the film is already close to breaking even.

While Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle was finally unseated, the film still only dropped 15.9%, making another $16.4 million. It has officially passed It and Spider-Man: Homecoming to become the fifth largest domestic grosser released in 2017. It’s approximately $50 million behind Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Having released in most international markets, it will likely fall just short.

Coming in third with an estimated $10.205 million was Hostiles, which expanded wide this past weekend after opening in limited release on December 22. The film reportedly had a budget of $39 million, meaning that it will have to climb to approximately $80 million to break even. While Christian Bale and crew were among those vying for Oscar nominations, the film fell short, perhaps due to a late October purchase by brand new distribution company Entertainment Studios — an unfortunate result as Bale’s performance is one of his best.

The Greatest Showman will just not quit, taking home $9.5 million for fourth place and a domestic total of $126.475 million. With two more solid weekends, the film should pass Transformers: The Last KnightWonder and Split on the 2017 domestic chart.

Finally, the recent Oscar nominees have faired well. The Post earned an estimated $8.85 million to bring its worldwide total to $83.035 million. It will certainly break even off of its $50 million budget. The Shape of Water added 1,001 theaters, making $5.7 million to bring its worldwide total to $51.581 million. The Guillermo del Toro film was made for an astonishing $19.5 million, meaning that it’s veering into profit territory now.

*All weekend numbers are domestic, meaning that they’re from theaters in the US and Canada, and are also estimates, reported by Box Office Mojo, with actuals coming out in the next few days.*

 

Featured image via 20th Century Fox.

Box Office Report: ‘Jumanji’ is rock solid as ’12 Strong’ opens strong

Here we are again, with Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle atop the box office. This weekend, its fifth, it pulled in an estimated $20.04 million, which is an astonishingly small 28.7% drop-off from the previous weekend. Its domestic total stands at $316.985 million and needs just under $18 million more to beat both It and Spider-Man: Homecoming to become the fifth largest domestic grosser released in 2017. The film has truly struck gold.

In second and third are two new releases, 12 Strong and Den of Thieves. The former, based on a true story of soldiers heading off to the Middle East almost immediately after 9/11, stars Chris Hemsworth, and made an estimated $16.5 million despite middle of the road reviews.

The latter, starring Gerard Butler, 50 Cent and O’Shea Jackson Jr., made a respectable $15.32 million, also in spite of rather poor reviews.

Coming in fourth is last weekends #2, Steven Spielberg’s The Post. In its wide release, the Tom Hanks-Meryl Streep vehicle is fairing rather well, boosting up to $45.191 domestically after $12.15 this weekend. On a budget of $50 million, the film will likely end up successful, especially once it receives Oscar nominations.

In fifth, and still holding strong, is Hugh Jackman’s The Greatest Showman with approximately $11 million. Domestically, the film has outperformed many other large budget spectacles, such as Blade Runner 2049. Its run speaks to the power of a wide demographic.

Star Wars: The Last Jedi just passed a milestone, crossing into $600 million domestically — $604.284 to be exact. It is only the sixth film to ever do so. It’s unclear if it will beat Marvel’s The Avengers $623.357, but there’s certainly a shot

Paul Thomas Anderson’s Phantom Thread expanded from 62 theaters into 896, and made an estimated $3.37 million. It’ll be interesting to see how well it does as it continues to expand and if its star, Daniel-Day Lewis, does get an Oscar nomination.

Finally, Call Me by Your Name also expanded, from 174 theaters into 815, but in much worse fashion, pulling in only $1.505 million. The film had been in limited release since November and it seems as though anticipation has fizzled out and that it still isn’t even in enough theaters to gain traction. Sony Pictures Classics botched this release plan, and now must hedge bets on Oscar nominations pushing some to go see it.

*All weekend numbers are domestic, meaning that they’re from theaters in the US and Canada, and are also estimates, reported by Box Office Mojo, with actuals coming out in the next few days.*

 

Featured image via Columbia Pictures

2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Original Song

Best Original Song doesn’t always go to the best song. Oftentimes, it’s a popularity contest, like last year’s “City of Stars” win, and this year is no different.

The song that should be winning, Sufjan Stevens’ “Visions of Gideon,” from Call Me by Your Name, wasn’t even nominated. Out of the nominees, Stevens still has the best song with “Mystery of Love,” an endlessly moving ballad. While it won at the Guild of Music Supervisors Awards, it has next to no momentum heading into Oscar night.

Mudbound‘s Mary J. Blige double dipped at this Oscars, receiving nominations in Best Supporting Actress and in Best Original Song for “Mighty River.” That acting nomination could push plenty of voters to opt for her in Original Song.

Perhaps the second best song, Coco‘s “Remember Me,” a culturally infused, heartbreaking song that’s integral to the plot of the film, is a definite contender, as it comes from a Pixar film and plays during a point of the film that makes nearly everyone cry.

The La La Land songwriting team, massive marketing in itself, worked on The Greatest Showman, and the number “This Is Me” has certainly been the talking point of the season as it champions diversity and is almost frustratingly catchy. The song won at the Golden Globes, and was a theme at the Winter Olympics. It’s not a lock, but it’s the most obvious choice to make and, as “City of Stars” showed last year, that could easily be the right choice.

The Nominees
“Mystery of Love,” Sufjan Stevens — Call Me by Your Name
“This Is Me,” Benj Hasek, Justin Paul — The Greatest Showman
“Remember Me,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez — Coco
“Stand Up For Something,” Diane Warren, Common — Marshall
“Mighty River,” Mary J. Blige — Mudbound

Will win: “This Is Me,” Benj Hasek, Justin Paul — The Greatest Showman
Could win: “Remember Me,” Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez — Coco
Should win: “Mystery of Love,” Sufjan Stevens — Call Me by Your Name
Should’ve been nominated: “Visions of Gideon,” Sufjan Stevens — Call Me by Your Name

 

Featured image via Twentieth Century Fox.

Box Office Report: ‘Jumanji’ holds strong as ‘The Post’ expands wide

In its fourth weekend of release, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle topped the box office with an estimated $27.035 million. The film has traversed a bizarre path, opening in December with $36.169 million, jumping up the following weekend to $50.051 million, falling only 25.6% to $37.233 million in its third weekend before dropping another minuscule 27.4% this weekend. Even with the holiday break, the numbers are absolutely outstanding, especially its past two weekends as normal fall off usually hits between 40%-65%.  Jumanji currently sits at $283.17 million from the US and Canada, making it the 8th largest domestic grosser released in 2017. With further success, it could even pass Thor: Ragnarok at $313 million.

The Post took second place with an estimated $18.6 million after three weekends in limited release, which is an expectedly plentiful expansion considering the involved talent of Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks. The film made roughly $4.5 million and now has a domestic total of $23.089 million. It is expected to earn multiple Oscar nominations next week.

In third was the Liam Neeson action film The Commuter, earning approximately $13.45 million. The reviews have been subpar, but, as a January opening, the film should ultimately find success.

As horror films tend to, Insidious: The Last Key held strong with a take of $12.135 million. Worldwide, the film has made $92.575 million on a $10 million budget, turning a massive profit.

The Greatest Showman has stuck in the area of $10 million each of its four weekends of release, seemingly put off by those visiting Jumanji or Star Wars: The Last Jedi. But with its $11.8 million weekend for a worldwide total of $194.673 million, the Hugh Jackman musical has likely crossed even off of an $84 million budget.

Speaking of The Last Jedi, the eight Star Wars episode pushed closer to becoming the sixth film to ever cross $600 million domestically after its $11.275 million earnings this past weekend. While the film is lagging behind Star Wars: The Force Awakens, it is still one of the most financially successful films of all time.

*All weekend numbers are domestic, meaning that they’re from theaters in the US and Canada, and are also estimates, reported by Box Office Mojo, with actuals coming out in the next few days.*

 

Featured image via Columbia Pictures

‘The Greatest Showman’ Review: Too showy and never great

It’s never a great sign when many aspects of a film have been done better elsewhere, which is the case with the Hugh Jackman-starring musical The Greatest Showman

In it, Jackman plays P.T. Barnum, a showman in the late 1800s, and he’s unsurprisingly charming. But Jackman has played almost this exact role before with far more complexity and emotional vigor in The Prestige. If one has seen the Christopher Nolan film, it’s difficult to watch The Greatest Showman without thinking of it.

Television spots will also make sure that the general public knows that the songwriters on this film are the Oscar-winning duo behind La La Land. And while there are some rousing numbers, such as the popular “This Is Me,” the music never really plants itself in viewers’ minds as each piece feels overdone and jarringly anachronistic. The seemingly key ingredients that the duo is missing are the musical help of the masterful Justin Hurwitz, composer of La La Land, and a good story.

The music seems to end up emotionally manipulative because the story asks the songs to do the leg work. When key character development is meant to occur, we’re asked to accept it in the form of a song. This can occasionally work when the song is beyond exceptional, such as the gleefully playful and vulnerable “A Lovely Night” or the heart-wrenching “Audition (The Fools Who Dream),” both from La La Land. But no song here reaches that kind of level, resulting in what is meant to be an emotional journey falling flat.

“This Is Me” comes close, but that song leads to another issue with the film, which posits itself as a celebration of humanity through outcasts and those who’ve been othered. But, outside of the song, the film never takes the point of view of those characters nor develops them thoroughly. At one point, one of them professes his appreciation for the “family” that Barnum has built. Yet, we haven’t seen much of this family in the first place and we’ve seen too much of Barnum treating them poorly for a redemption to be earned, or for its purported celebration to be earned either.

Strangely, though, it’s difficult to entirely hate the film. It’s not consistently visually dazzling, but it has its moments of pure wonder amid colorful, eye-popping costumes and sets. To go along with that, there’s an undercurrent of a struggle for happiness in every storyline, which latches on, at least loosely. And Zendaya stands out with the most lived-in and genuinely felt performance.

If anything, The Greatest Showman is a film that can bring families to a show, just as Barnum did. That’s worth something.

Grade: C-

 

Featured image 20th Century Fox.